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Home Business – Understanding Facebook “Promoted Posts”

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by Harriet Bond
(San Francisco, CA, USA)

Whether the purpose of your Facebook page is to promote your offline “brick and mortar” business, or you hope to use it to help publicize books or other information products, creating a Facebook page and getting people to click to become fans is only the first step in your social network marketing campaign.

You must find a way to hold the interest of your potential customers and get them to interact with your page in order for a Facebook pageto become an effective marketing tool.

Creating a Facebook page and recruiting potential customers to become fans of it can require a considerable investment of time or money or both. Many Facebook page owners don’t realize that a huge percentage of the fans they recruit never see the updates they post.

Facebook uses a secret scoring system to determine whether your page updates will be interesting enough to show to your fans. Some evidence indicates that a huge factor in that scoring system is the amount of interaction a fan makes with your page. If they click to “like” or to share your postings, or even better comment on them, then those fans are more likely to see your posts when they sign in to Facebook in the future.

The ideal method for engaging your fans is to grab their interest from the first moment they join your page as a fan and then hold their attention from that point forward. In the real world though, we often fail at that task. Earlier this year, Facebook created a way to help page owners recover from this mistake. This new tool is called “Promoted Posts”.

A promoted post works in much the same manner as Facebook ads do. However, a promoted post is more highly targeted. You are attempting to regain, or keep, the interest of potential customers who have already shown an interest in your business or your product but they just haven’t been paying attention lately.

To promote a post, you will go through the same process you would normally use to share an update on your page. However, there is now a button at the bottom of the posting window which says “Promote”. When you click on that dropdown button, you will be able to set a budget for promoting your post. This won’t be a daily budget, but a lifetime budget that will stay in place as long as you promote that post.

When you enter the budget, Facebook will give you an estimate of how many fans the post will reach. You can turn off the promotion at any time. At this time you will pick the audience for your post. You can choose to promote it only to people who have already liked your page but don’t regularly interact with it, or to those people and their friends.

When you promote a post, be sure not to just use some high pressure sales announcement. Make it something really good that will encourage interaction with your page and reduce the need to use promoted posts in the future. Free items or services, contests, pictures and videos work well, but you will want to use your ad campaign dashboard to analyze whether your tactics are working or not and then tweak your post to increase your response.

Facebook gives page owners an amazing amount of information on their fans’ activities. This information was previously either impossible to obtain or required expensive tracking software. It now comes free with your Facebook page.

Never before in history has target marketing been as easily accomplished as it can be today with Facebook. Don’t wait to take advantage of the most popular social networking system on the planet to promote your business.

Updated: November 12, 2013 — 1:10 am

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